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Best TV Moments of 2012

From acid-loving ad men to out-of-control spooks and the triumphant return of Bubba, the greatest couch-surfing moments of 2012.

From acid-loving ad men to out-of-control spooks and the triumphant return of Bubba, the greatest couch-surfing moments of 2012.

By Rob Sheffield

community

Justin Lubin/NBC

6

Dan Harmon’s cosmic goodbye

Community, NBC

The ousted Community creator's endgame was a glorious blast of geek kamikaze – he knew he was going down in flames, so he did it in style. He finished up his three-season run on TV's best sitcom with a string of surreal episodes that were just "crazy-town banana-pants": the 8-bit video-game one, the Civil War one, even the group-therapy one. ("You shared this delusion with each other, like that time all these people got into swing-dance music back in the Nineties.") But the peak had to be the "Basic Lupine Urology" episode, a hilarious satire of crime dramas, from Law & Order to The Wire. (We even get Omar saying, "A man's gotta have a code.") It was a rapid-fire rampage of cop-show clichés – "Cleanup on Aisle Busted!" Yet it was also the season's bizarro emotional highlight. Not that Community would ever have any other kind.

breaking bad

Ursula Coyote/AMC

5

Walter White vs. Mike Ehrmantraut

Breaking Bad, AMC

Jonathan Banks walked away with this season's MVP honors, right? As hard-boiled hood Mike Ehrmantraut, he was pure deadpan menace: "You know, I can foresee a lot of possible outcomes to this thing, and not a single one of them involves Miller Time." His drug partnership with Walter White (Bryan Cranston) was doomed to end ugly. And no, it did not involve Miller Time. Let's let Mike get the last word: "You know how they say, 'It's been a pleasure'? It hasn't."

fox news

The Washington Post/Getty Images

4

Fox News’ election-night freakout

Fox News

It could have been a reality show called I Refuse to Believe America Has Fallen Out of Love With the Corpse of Strom Thurmond! Karl Rove and his game-of-drones crew frothing with rage after they lost the election was six flavors of schadenfreude caviar. Even Megyn Kelly, usually the most reliable of Fox droids, had to ask, "Is this just math that you do as a Republican to make yourself feel better?"

girls

HBO

3

Lena Dunham goes dominatrix

Girls, HBO

Her HBO comedy had no shortage of sexual cringe-gasms – but this one really took the cookie. Dunham's dysfunctional heroine goes to her asshole boyfriend's house to tell him she's through. We figure we'll never miss him and neither will she. Except. Except then he starts beating off and Hannah yells at him and he gets into that and she gets into it. Suddenly she's humiliating him, degrading him, taking his money. "You heard me, you filthy boy. I want cab money. Twenty! Thirty! Because I also want pizza and gum!" That's the moment when Girls jumped from good to genius. Who says romance is dead?

louis ck

FX

2

Louis C.K. meets Parker Posey

Louie, FX

Louie had his share of hideously horrific dates, from Melissa Leo to Chloë Sevigny, this year, but he met his match in his rooftop rendezvous with Parker Posey, who comes on as an even bigger mess than he is. (When your date orders a drink and the bartender tells her, "Not after last time," that might be considered a warning sign.) How many movies have you seen where there's a romantic moment on a roof or balcony? But they never show you the couple schlepping up the stairs (huff, puff, wheeze) or details like how anxious Louie gets when Parker wanders too close to the edge (which is what would totally ruin the night for me). Like everything else on Louie, it was funny, scary, poignant and deeply frustrating in the best possible way.

mad men

Jordin Althaus

1

Roger Sterling’s acid trip

For the first half, Season Five wasn't just the best Mad Men season – it was shaping up to be the greatest run any TV show has ever had. It didn't quite get there – the title is still held by Season Four. But this was the White Album of Mad Men seasons, a risky mess where Don Draper and his crew of hustlers finally meet their match in the madness of 1966. Draper couldn't even make it all the way through his first listen to Revolver. The whole season was a full-on portrait of America in the Sixties: drugs, blow jobs, civil rights, Sally's go-go boots. And if this was Mad Men's White Album, Roger Sterling's LSD trip was the "Dear Prudence." You always knew somebody at Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce was going to get psychedelic, but who the hell thought this guy would be the one to chase the white rabbit? In the summer of 1966, Roger – the last guy you'd ever call cosmic – gets a weird psychedelic glimpse of his future and peeks into the nearest faraway places in his lost soul. He sees everything that's wrong about his life. But then his spiritual bliss wears off and he goes back to being his corrupt, cynical self. That's bad news for him – but good for us, because Mad Men just keeps peaking creatively and is still far ahead of anything else out there on TV.

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