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Best Actor Oscar-Winners Since 2000, Ranked Worst to Best

From French comics to Method-acting chameleons, our updated list on the gentleman who have taken home the 21st-century gold

On Sunday night, five men will square off at the Academy Awards for Best Actor – only one of them is walking away with the gold. This century has seen a wide variety of performers claim this particular prize, everyone from French comic actors to veteran American stars, newcomers to established Hollywood names resurrecting their careers. Some of those performances already seem guaranteed to stand the test of time. Others … well, nobody’s perfect, especially Oscar voters, who often pick their winners for reasons that are unfathomable to the rest of us.

So in honor of the 89th Academy Awards, we wanted to look back at the last 18 years of Best Actor champs, ranking them in order of greatness. A couple things we learned in the process, though: 1.) Playing a real person helps your chances of nabbing an Oscar (10 of the 16 winners fall into that category); and 2.) Your chances of winning go up immeasurably if you happen to be Sean Penn or Daniel Day-Lewis (they’ve both won two Oscars this century).  

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HOLLYWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 24: Actor Daniel Day-Lewis accepts the Best Actor award for "Lincoln" from presenter Meryl Streep onstage during the Oscars held at the Dolby Theatre on February 24, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

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Daniel Day-Lewis, ‘There Will Be Blood’

To prepare to play Daniel Plainview, the towering, greedy misanthrope who strides the landscape like a lanky giant in There Will Be Blood, Daniel Day-Lewis studied Dust Bowl-era audio recordings, as well as tapes of actor-director John Huston. From those sources and others, he crafted one of the signature depictions of American exceptionalism writ large. Very, very large, actually: Everything about Plainview is oversized, including his avarice, pettiness, competitiveness — and especially his ruthless certainty that, somehow, sucking up all the oil in the American West will fill the void in his soul. It's a performance that's both endearingly gonzo and also shockingly, unexpectedly tender. But above all it's so stunningly assured and complete that it's as if the actor and writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson are showing us something dark, rotten and true about capitalism itself. Oscar voters didn't so much award him Best Actor but, rather, acquiesce to his portrayal's indomitable, imposing magnificence.

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