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25 Best Coen Brother Characters

From Barton Fink to the Dude, counting down Joel and Ethan’s craziest, most unforgettable creations

Fargo; Coen Brother; Characters; Raising Arizona; The Big Lebowski

20th Century Fox Film/Everett, Gramercy Pictures/Photofest, Mary Evans/Working Title/Ronald Grant/Everett

A classic Hollywood leading man who's duped into participating in his own kidnapping. An Esther Williams-like bathing beauty who talks like a Brooklyn dock worker. A happy hoofer harboring a secret. A studio fixer stuck in an existential crisis of faith. Not one but two chirpy gossipmongers, both played by Tilda Swinton. Like most Coen brothers movies, the siblings' latest — the old-timey Tinseltown satire Hail, Caesar! — is chock full of goofs, rubes, dames (of the daffy and determined variety), swells, thugs, mugs, and the occasional pure-of-heart innocent. But all of the singular creations in Joel and Ethan's new comedy come from a long line of unforgettable heroes and villains that have graced the cinema du Coen since the very beginning.

So in honor of the movie hitting theaters today, we're counting down the 25 best Coen brother characters of all time — from anxious playwrights to morally bankrupt criminals, hysterical wannabe moms to stoic hit men, dumb-as-a-brick he-men to the Dude himself.

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20th Century Fox Film/Everett, Gramercy Pictures/Photofest, Mary Evans/Working Title/Ronald Grant/Everett

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Walter Sobchak (‘The Big Lebowski’)

"Over the line!" John Goodman traded his teddy-bear persona for this aggro cargo shorts-wearing lunatic bowler — the kind of gung-ho fanatic willing to draw a pistol on anyone who doesn't play by the rules. Moreover, he can get you a toe by 3 o'clock. But Walter's fly-in-the-ointment Tasmanian devil gets a key twist — it involves his religious affiliation — as befitting the cinematic tricksters behind the camera. (The character is roughly based on Joel and Ethan's screenwriter pal, Hollywood legend/Conan the Barbarian director John Milius.) He's a good friend to the Dude, and though his bull-in-a-chinaman's-shop presence is just a set-up for catastrophe, he's one of the few reliable presence's in Lebwoski's life. Jeff Bridges delivers a summation of Sobchak that, after the laughs die down, lingers as a profound commentary on human relationships. "No, you're not wrong, Walter. You're just an asshole." JH

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Anton Chigurh (‘No Country for Old Men’)

This take on Cormac McCarthy's pomo pulp novel was the Coen brothers' first official adaptation, but Javier Bardem's performance as sociopathic hitman Anton Chigurh made it feel like a true original. Unleashing the latent evil of the pageboy haircut, Chigurh stalks the southern border states with a coin and a cattle gun, offering everyone unlucky enough to cross his path a 50-percent chance of survival (at best). But the thing that makes him one of cinema's scariest serial killers is that, for all of the people he kills, the assassin still thinks of himself as a simple expression of an indifferent universe . He just flips the quarter; you're the one who has to call it, friendo. DE

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20th Century Fox Film/Everett, Gramercy Pictures/Photofest, Mary Evans/Working Title/Ronald Grant/Everett

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Jeffrey Lebowski (‘The Big Lebowski’)

That's his proper Christian name, thought he mostly answer to "The Dude" — you can call him "His Dudeness," however, or "Duder," or even "El Duderino" if you're not in to that whole brevity thing. Jeff Bridges' hero is many things: a stoner Angeleno, a first-rate bowler, a loyal friend and Creedence Clearwater Revival fan, a White Russian connoiseur, one of the authors of the Port Huron statement (the original, not the compromised second version), and, according to some cowboy narrators, a man for his time 'n' place. But first and foremost, Lebowski is a prime Coen creation, the sort of genial dope who the brothers specialize in and who, thanks to the movie's bearded star, a modern Zen-philosopher cult figure who abides in the hearts of millions. You do not need to have attended multiple Lebowskifests in your tattered bathrobe to recognize that the character has become even more popular and well-known than the men who spawned him. And if you don't agree with us, well, that's just like, your opinion, man. DF

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20th Century Fox Film/Everett, Gramercy Pictures/Photofest, Mary Evans/Working Title/Ronald Grant/Everett

1

Marge Gunderson (‘Fargo’)

For too long, the knock on the Coens was that they savored mocking their characters, relished reducing them to regional caricatures. Fargo put that criticism to rest forever. Yes, Joel and Ethan enjoyed teasing the long-vowels speaking style of the film's Minnesotans, but in Marge Gunderson they crafted their most humane, decent, deeply endearing protagonist. Played by Frances McDormand, who won a Best Actress Oscar for the role, Marge is the exact opposite of the tough-gal heroine we usually see in action movies and thrillers: She's a happily married, very pregnant, generally sunny, stunningly ordinary police chief who just so happens to be terrific at her job. Amidst Fargo's den of cheats, murderers and flop-sweating, no-good husbands, Marge was the sweet voice of sanity, her homespun Midwestern charm so heartfelt that it belied the steely determination underneath. The Coen brothers have long examined the quirky and the misfits: In Marge, they dared to show the rich, beguiling complexity of the everyday. TG

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