Best Actor Oscar-Winners Since 2000, Ranked Worst to Best

From French comics to Method-acting chameleons, our updated list on the gentleman who have taken home the 21st-century gold

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1. Daniel Day-Lewis, 'There Will Be Blood'

To prepare to play Daniel Plainview, the towering, greedy misanthrope who strides the landscape like a lanky giant in There Will Be Blood, Daniel Day-Lewis studied Dust Bowl-era audio recordings, as well as tapes of actor-director John Huston. From those sources and others, he crafted one of the signature depictions of American exceptionalism writ large. Very, very large, actually: Everything about Plainview is oversized, including his avarice, pettiness, competitiveness — and especially his ruthless certainty that, somehow, sucking up all the oil in the American West will fill the void in his soul. It's a performance that's both endearingly gonzo and also shockingly, unexpectedly tender. But above all it's so stunningly assured and complete that it's as if the actor and writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson are showing us something dark, rotten and true about capitalism itself. Oscar voters didn't so much award him Best Actor but, rather, acquiesce to his portrayal's indomitable, imposing magnificence.

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