Omarosa Manigault Vows 'Profound' Tell-All After Dramatic White House Exit

"I have seen things that have made me uncomfortable, that have upset me," former reality star says of her year in Trump administration

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Omarosa Manigault Vows 'Profound' Tell-All After Dramatic White House Exit

UPDATE: Omarosa Manigualt sat down for an interview with ABC's Good Morning America Thursday to contend that she had not, in fact, been fired, but had decided to resign after one year in the White House.

"I resigned, and I didn't do that in the residence as reported," she said. "John Kelly and I sat down in the Situation Room … and we had a very candid conversation. I wanted to make the one-year mark and then get back to my life."

Maniqualt added that she plans to eventually tell-all about what went down in the White House during Trump's first year of presidency, but until she officially vacates her role in January, she is remaining mum.

"I have seen things that have made me uncomfortable, that have upset me, that have affected me deeply and emotionally, that has affected my community and my people," she said. "And when I can tell my story, it is a profound story that I know the world will want to hear. ... I can't expand on it because I have to go back and work with these individuals."

ORIGINAL STORY: Omarosa Manigualt is out at the White House. The former Apprentice contestant, who made a name for herself as the reality series' resident villainess back in 2004, will no longer act as the president's director of communications for the White House Office of Public Liaison, it was announced Wednesday.

"Omarosa Manigault Newman resigned yesterday to pursue other opportunities," White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement. "Her departure will not be effective until January 20, 2018. We wish her the best in future endeavors and are grateful for her service."

Manigault's exit may not have come about as peaceably as Huckabee's statement makes it sound, however. According to American Urban Radio Network's White House Correspondent & Washington Bureau Chief April Ryan, there was a commotion on Tuesday night, resulting in Manigault's ouster.

"I am hearing from several sources there was a lot of drama at the White House last night and it wasn't about the Alabama election. #fired," she tweeted early Wednesday. "Stay tuned."

Approximately half an hour later, Ryan added that she heard Manigault "was escorted out of the building and off campus."

Manigault's tenure in the White House and the contributions of the Office of Public Liaison as a whole have come under scrutiny over the past year, according to Politico. The site reports that some White House officials saw the Office of Public Liaison as one of the most unruly and under-utilized operations in the West Wing, with many aides in other departments unsure of what the office actually did.

The Office of Public Liaison primarily works to cultivate outside support for the president's agenda, working with business, religious and other groups – such as veterans – to help bolster the president's agenda through conferences and events.

According to Politico, however, Manigault repeatedly made headlines for the wrong reasons: in April, on her wedding day, she invited her 39-person bridal party to the White House for an extended photo shoot, surprising fellow senior aides and security officials, who were unsure whether she had obtained permission for the shoot.

Manigault was reportedly later banned from posting the pictures online due to security and ethical concerns.

Then, later that same month, the Office of Public Liaison reportedly didn't have the Rose Garden or East Room booked for a visit by the nation’s top teachers, resulting in confusion and frustration from family members who thought they would get a chance to be inside the White House during the visit.

Manigault also caused a ruckus at the National Association of Black Journalists convention in August after she refused to answer questions about police brutality, and jumped to Trump's defense after the moderator pointed to comments the president had made suggesting police officers should rough up suspects while taking them into custody.

"I don't want to hear your question," Manigault said at the time, talking over the moderator. "I don't want to hear a lecture."

The White House has not yet commented on details regarding the circumstances surrounding Manigault's departure.