Hear George Carlin Rail Against Police Brutality in Unreleased Bit

Comedian cracks down on crooked cops, praises Jesus for not being a rat in routine from upcoming posthumous release

George Carlin unleashes a hilarious tirade against crooked cops and rails against police brutality in a new bit from his upcoming posthumous release. Credit: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty

George Carlin aligns himself with crooks and bashes crooked cops in a hilarious clip from the late comedian's upcoming posthumous release, I Kinda Like It When a Lotta People Die.

"Rats and Squealers," recorded 15 years ago, opens with Carlin growling, "You don't help the police — when I was a kid and we went to the movies, we rooted against the police … I love the crooks. I don't give a shit if they come to my house and kill my entire family. I'm on their side."

Carlin then unspools an array of righteous complaints against nefarious cops who plant evidence, harass minorities, plant weapons on unarmed people they've killed and then lie about it in court — it's a vicious sequence that unfortunately feels less prescient than it does enduringly relevant.

But Carlin finds plenty of humor in his anger. "They perjure themselves routinely, but they don't squeal on each other," the comedian says. "They're not rats. So take a page from their book, but never, ever help them. And above all, don't plea bargain by turning in a friend."

Carlin follows this notion for the rest of the bit, joking that during the rapture you won't be able to turn in your family to God in exchange for salvation, and then noting that Jesus should've "beat the shit out of Judas" for being a rat.

SiriusXM will debut Carlin's I Kinda Like it When a Lotta People Die September 1st on its Carlin's Corner channel at 4 p.m. ET, and then on its Comedy Greats channel at 7 p.m. ET. The album will be released on September 16th.

The new project collects several unreleased Carlin bits, including an infamous routine about mass fatalities that was recorded the day before 9/11 and gives the album its title. The album also features a home recording of Carlin from 1957, as well as interviews with his manager Jerry Hamza and Rocco Urbisci, the director of 10 Carlin specials.