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$1 Million Worth of Sports Cards Found in Abandoned Warehouse

Urban explorers uncover treasure trove of Topps cards in a vacant building, and it’s all theirs for the taking

abandoned building in Detroit

An abandoned building in Detroit, MI.

Geoffrey George/Getty

In news that will make your hoarding uncle smile, turns out there’s treasure to be found in just about every pile of trash.

Or, in abandoned buildings. As you probably know, Detroit is home to thousands of dilapidated warehouses and factories. What you may not know is that some are filled with hidden gems that could make you very rich. According to the Daily Mail, a group of urban explorers, who enjoy sifting through the sorts of places you’d expect to see in, like, RoboCop, struck gold recently when they found millions of old Topps cards, most still packed in crates, inside a vacant Motor City building.

While they failed to score any rare cards, some of which fetch over $100,000 on the open market, the haul of MLB, NHL and NASCAR cards from the 1980s and 90s is more about quantity than quality. When you consider that each card is valued between 99 cents and $5.99, the haul adds up to a lot of dough. Like, way more than $1 million.

Technically, the cards belong to whoever owns the building or paid to have them stored them there. Seeing as most were boxed up and ready to be shipped, the safe bet is on the site being a former packaging facility. But technicalities get tossed out the window when no one has set foot on the premises in decades, meaning the cards are all up for grabs. One dude, clearly not worried about legality (or the PSA), even sells the cards online as his primary source of income. Detroit hustles hard.

What does this mean for the rest of us? Nothing, really – though it probably wouldn’t hurt to take a look through those cardboard boxes you’ve got stashed in your attic. After all, as any 12 year old will surely tell you, these cards could be worth money some day.

In This Article: Baseball, MLB, sports

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