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Revenge-Porn Operator Asks Google to Remove Past History

Craig Brittain, founder of IsAnybodyDown.com, requests DMCA to remove news stories containing “unauthorized use of photos of me”

Craig Brittain

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In January, the Federal Trade Commission ruled that Craig Brittain, the former operator of revenge-porn hub IsAnybodyDown.com, was banned from publishing nude images of people without their consent. Now, according to Ars Technica (via Gawker), the case has taken an ironic twist: Brittain has demanded that Google remove links about the ruling from their search results, citing “unauthorized use of photos of me and other related information” in a newly filed DMCA takedown request.

Brittain’s request specifies 23 links, including reports from Gawker, Huffington Post, Reddit, Forbes, Salon and Vice. In addition to the articles’ use of photos and information, Brittain also complains about “unauthorized copying of excerpts from isanybodydown.com” and “using photos which are not ‘fair use.'”

The DMCA requires sites like Google to remove links which infringe upon content at request of rights holders. But Ars Technica argues that, in this case, “fair use and general First Amendment principles are on Google’s and the media’s side.” 

Craig Brittain

According to the FTC’s report, the Colorado-based porn boss used various deceitful methods of obtaining nude photos (mostly of women), which he uploaded to the site – along with names, birth dates and Facebook profiles – without permission. Brittain reportedly earned around $12,000 from the site, which was launched in late 2011 and taken down in 2013. In addition to uploading content from over 1,000 people, he reportedly managed two removal services that could delete photos and information for payments between $200 and $500.

One day after the FTC’s ruling, Brittain issued a statement on IsAnybodyDown.com, denying many of the organization’s claims about his methods and expressing regret for posting the content. “I want to apologize to those who were affected by Is Anybody Down?” he wrote. “I made a series of poor decisions, then tried to rationalize them, and made it even worse. I am sorry for the damage that I caused to everyone that ended up on my website.”

In This Article: Pornography

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