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See Wynwood Walls’ Stunning Street Art in Miami

Recently a rundown textile and manufacturing area in Miami, a graffiti explosion helped transform it into the Wynwood Arts District.

The outdoor walls at Wynwood's Jose De Diego Middle School have been transformed into huge canvases, each meticulously painted, with some murals focusing on typography – featuring inspirational statements, like "Believe"

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

Now one of the most exciting street art and graffiti meccas in the country, Miami’s Wynwood area hasn’t just been revitalized for artists and art-lovers. See how local creators collaborated to completely transform a local middle school’s campus – and what inspires their vibrant work.

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

School’s in Session

Rios collaborated with multiple Miami artists – Ahol Sniffs Glue, Typoe, Santiago Rubino and FL.Mingo – to bring challenging concepts to the Wynwood’s Jose De Diego Middle School campus.

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

Miami Style

Typoe, one third of an art collective known as Primary Flight, along with Cristina Gonzalez and Books Bischof, started in Wynwood when Art Basel launched in 2007. Having no luck at the fair, the trio decided street art was more lucrative. “We were just getting the exposure for ourselves,” Bischof explains to Rolling Stone.

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

The Eyes Have It

Ahol Sniffs Glue (real name David Anasagasti), whose signature mark is repeated spray-painted droopy eyes, started painting “for the fun, for the fame, for the rush,” he says.

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

Santiago Rubino

Santiago Rubino, born in Argentina, has a more melancholic tone; in his sensuous, surreal and monochromatic pieces, he explores the mysteries of life, challenging the viewer to question everything.

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

In Studio

“I always challenge myself … it’s all problem solving,” he tells Rolling Stone, referring to himself as a “masochist.”

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

FL.Mingo

Taking a cue from Banksy, FL.Mingo has remained anonymous thus far; for her, tagging is her primary medium.

David Cabrera for Rolling Stone

The Flamingo

She continues to use her flamingo with a crown symbol because she says she needed something instantly recognizable and distinctly “Miami.” FL.Mingo artwork is still featured at the Wynwood Walls area – but to Mingo, that’s not the real Wynwood.

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