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61 Reasons to Love 2014

From returning rock legends to heart-stopping thrillers, the best of what’s to come in music, movies and TV this year

Don't expect to get a cultural breather after the past 12 massive months: Beginning early in January, there are can't-miss concerts, new and returning watercooler TV shows and specials, albums from rock legends, and the release of big-budget popcorn flicks that'll have everyone talking. With the caveat that all dates are subject to change (and, in same cases, simply our best guesses) here are our picks for the music, movies and TV to watch out for in 2014. 

By Mike Ayers, David Fear, Blaine McEvoy, David Marchese and Dan Reilly

Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic

‘Veronica Mars’ (March 14th)

Proving that persistence and having a cast that ages well can really pay off, the beloved but low-rated television series, starring Kristen Bell as a young private eye, returns as a feature film thanks to a $5.7-million Kickstarter campaign. As a nod to the show's 2004 origin, the movie is set at Veronica's 10-year high school reunion, and over 15 members of the original cast will return as her family, friends, and enemies. Now a big-shot lawyer, Mars has to get back to sleuthing to help her ex-boyfriend prove his innocence in a murder case. 

Courtesy Summit Entertainment

‘Divergent’ (March 21st)

Anyone suffering from Hunger Games withdrawal should be able to help soothe their jones on March 21st with Divergent. Based on Veronica Roth's book of the same name, the film is set in a post-apocalyptic, dystopian version of Chicago where people are separated into factions based on their personalities. Naturally, the government is less benevolent than it appears. 

Courtesy Magnolia Pictures

‘Nymphomaniac’ (March 21st)

Director Lars von Trier's latest controversy-courting film stars his frequent collaborator Charlotte Gainsbourg as the titular character, named Joe, alongside Stellan Skarsgård, Shia LaBeouf, Uma Thurman, and Willem Dafoe. The two-part film is split into eight chapters that document Joe's life from birth to age 50, with plenty of explicit, often unsimulated sex scenes along the way.