Johnny Cash's Boyhood Home Vying for National Register of Historic Places

Great Depression-era farmhouse in Dyess, Arkansas was restored by Arkansas State University

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Johnny Cash's Boyhood Home Vying for National Register of Historic Places
Johnny Cash's boyhood home in Dyess, Arkansas, is being considered for the National Register of Historic Places.

Johnny Cash's boyhood home in Dyess, Arkansas may soon find itself listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Constructed in 1934, the humble farmhouse located about 30 miles from Memphis, Tennessee, was given to Cash's family, along with 40 acres of farmland, as part of a federal recovery program during the Great Depression.

Arkansas State University took on the task of restoring the property in 2011 and it was opened as a tourist attraction in 2015. This week, the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program will vote on whether or not the house should be considered a national landmark, with the final decision going to the National Park Service.

In other Cash news, his 2003 box set Unearthed was re-released in November as a deluxe vinyl package. Spanning nine LPs, the collection includes 79 songs and a 60-page coffee table book, featuring some of the last photos ever taken of Cash.