Rob Zombie Teams With 'American Psycho' Author for Charles Manson Show

Rocker will direct Bret Easton Ellis-penned Fox miniseries

Charles Manson
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Charles Manson
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The minds that independently came up with American Psycho's American psycho Patrick Bateman and a song that samples Manson Family member Patricia Krenwinkel telling Diane Sawyer "I'm already dead" are teaming for a limited TV series on Fox about the Manson Family killings.

Author Bret Easton Ellis and rocker Rob Zombie are in the early stages of development for the series, according to Variety. Ellis will write the script and undisclosed additional materials, while Zombie will direct. The show will revisit the people and events that played into one of the most horrific crimes in American history.

Charles Manson's De-Evolution: See His Twisted Path From Infamous Cult Leader to Grizzled Convict

In the hands of Ellis and Zombie, the story will be told from changing points of view as storylines converge around and after the murder spree that shocked the nation in the summer of 1969. It is being conceived as a multi-part series, but Variety says the final project has not yet received the green light.

"I have been obsessed with this insane story since I was a kid, so obviously I jumped at the chance to be involved in this incredible project," Zombie said. "After speaking with Bret, I immediately realized that we shared the same vision for this epic madness."

Photos: The Manson Family Tree

Zombie reportedly conceived the idea with a team at Madhouse Entertainment and brought it to Ellis and Alcon Television. The production companies have not yet optioned any source material, such as the book Helter Skelter or Rolling Stone's 1970 cover story on Manson, for the project.

Most recently, Ellis penned the screenplay for The Canyons, which starred Lindsay Lohan and was released last year. He is also reportedly working on the script for Kanye West's Yeezus movie. Last year, Zombie released his latest directorial effort The Lords of Salem.

Charles Manson Today: The Final Confessions of a Psychopath

Charles Manson was sentenced to death in 1971, but his sentence was changed to life in prison after California abolished the death penalty in 1972 (it has since reinstated it). To date, Manson has been denied parole 12 times.

Last year, Manson told Rolling Stone that through it all he feels like he has always kept his own best interests in mind. "I've always been pretty truthful with myself, as much as I can be under the circumstances," he said. "But I'll never tell on nobody, not even me, man, so that's why I ain't never told nobody what really happened back then. I can't tell you right now."