David Lynch Exits 'Twin Peaks' Reboot Over Budgetary Issues

"After one year and four months of negotiations, I left because not enough money was offered to do the script the way I felt it needed to be done," director announces

David Lynch has exited the "Twin Peaks" reboot over budgetary issues. Credit: Kevin Winter/Getty

David Lynch announced Sunday that he is exiting Showtime's Twin Peaks reboot after failing to come to terms on a contract with the cable network. After rumors emerged that Showtime was nixing its planned nine-episode continuation of Lynch's iconic mystery series, the Blue Velvet director instead informed fans that it was he who was leaving the project over budgetary issues and that, as of now, the series will carry on without him.

"Showtime did not pull the plug on Twin Peaks. After one year and four months of negotiations, I left because not enough money was offered to do the script the way I felt it needed to be done," Lynch wrote on Facebook. "This weekend I started to call actors to let them know I would not be directing. Twin Peaks may still be very much alive at Showtime. I love the world of Twin Peaks and wish things could have worked out differently."

Lynch previously hinted that there was some "complications" with the reboot, saying at his Australian Between Two Worlds exhibit opening in March that he didn't know if the show was still happening. When the series was announced in October, it was revealed that Lynch and co-creator Mark Frost would pen the reboot's scripts, with Lynch signing on to direct all nine episodes. Twin Peaks cast members Kyle MacLachlan, Sherilyn Fenn and Dana Ashbrook were all reportedly on board to reprise their roles.

In a statement to Variety, Showtime confirmed that Lynch had exited the reboot, but didn't confirm whether the new series – which is already written – would continue without him. "We were saddened to read David Lynch's statement today, since we believed we were working towards solutions with David and his reps on the few remaining deal points," Showtime said in a statement. "Showtime also loves the world of Twin Peaks, and we continue to hold out hope that we can bring it back in all its glory with both of its extraordinary creators, David Lynch and Mark Frost, at its helm."

If Showtime does opt to proceed without one of Twin Peaks' chief visionaries, the reboot will pick up 25 years after the original series, which ran on ABC for two seasons from 1989 to 1990, left off. The mystery of Laura Palmer's murder also spawned the feature film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. "Set in the present day, Twin Peaks will continue the lore of the original series, providing long-awaited answers and a satisfying conclusion for the series’ passionate fan base," Showtime promised. The reboot was scheduled to air in 2016.