Cult British Comedy 'Peep Show' Gets Starz Adaptation

BAFTA-winning sitcom lands U.S. development deal after connecting with American fans on Netflix

Beloved British comedy 'Peep Show' will enjoy a second life as an American adaptation after series' producers agreed to a development deal with Starz. Credit: BBC

Beloved British comedy Peep Show ended its nine-season Channel 4 run in December, but the sitcom will enjoy a second life as an American adaptation. The series' producers agreed to a development deal with Starz to bring Peep Show stateside, Variety reports.

The dark comedy starred comedy team David Mitchell and Robert Webb as roommates/social misfits navigating everyday life. The show was presented in a first-person perspective, with viewers assuming the gaze of either Mitchell's Mark or Webb's Jeremy while the respective comedian provided his dialogue in voiceover.

Peep Show's creators Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong will serve as consulting producers on the adaptation, with Blunt Talk and Wilfred executive producer Eli Jorne on board as showrunner. "We are hugely relieved to hand over the responsibility of coming up with the dark and twisted thoughts of two terrible men to the extremely funny, dark and twisted Eli Jorne," Bain and Armstrong said in a statement.

The series was a two-time BAFTA winner during its nine-season run, which caught on with American audiences thanks to the ability to stream the show on Netflix. It's unclear whether any British cast members will reprise their roles for the U.S. version.

British comedies have seen varying amounts of success upon landing American adaptations: While Ricky Gervais' The Office spawned the hugely successful Steve Carell-starring NBC series and Man About the House became Three's Company in the Seventies, the comedies are more commonly lost in translation: Cult British comedies Spaced and The IT Crowd didn't make it past the pilot stage, while adaptations of Men Behaving Badly and Sirens only lasted two seasons on U.S. television before its cancellation.