Bryan Cranston to Reprise Tony-Winning Role in 'All the Way' for HBO

'Breaking Bad' actor made his Broadway debut as President Lyndon B. Johnson earlier this year

Bryan Cranston All the Way
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Bryan Cranston in 'All The Way'
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Bryan Cranston will bring his Tony-award winning portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson to HBO as the network has secured the broadcast rights to the hit Broadway show, All the Way, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Cranston earned rave reviews for his Broadway debut when All The Way opened earlier this year, following a short stint in Boston. The show documents LBJ's tumultuous first year in office in the wake of John F. Kennedy's assassination, specifically focusing on the escalating Vietnam War and the Texan's behind-the-scenes fight to pass Civil Rights legislation. Not only did Cranston win Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play, but the show itself took home the Tony for Best Play.

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Steven Spielberg is set to help executive produce All the Way for HBO, while author Robert Schenkkan will return to adapt his script into a TV movie. The Pulitzer Prize-winning writer previously penned four episodes of the premium network's World War II miniseries, The Pacific.

Along with his Tony for playing LBJ, Cranston earned hardware from the Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle and Theater World Awards. All the Way marked one of the actor's first major roles after a career-making stint as science-teacher-turned-meth-kingpin Walter White on Breaking Bad, which wrapped up its run last September. Cranston recently appeared in the reboot of Godzilla, and is set to star as blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo in the forthcoming Jay Roach-directed biopic, Trumbo.

As to why he took the ostensibly tamer role of President Johnson in All the Way after the nail-biting action of Breaking Bad, Cranston told Rolling Stone: "[T]he story of LBJ is so epic. It's enormous and wonderful and all encompassing, and there is no way that you can 'sort of' do it – you have to really dive into this situation that he was in. You need to wallow in his highs and his lows. A lot of things surprised me about his nature. He was a man who was accomplished and determined and politically savvy. At the same time there was a humorous side to him, and a fragility to his character that is also very interesting."

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