40 Greatest Sketch-Comedy TV Shows of All Time

From Caesar to Schumer, 65 years of the Land Shark, the Chicken Lady and a bunch of Muppets

3. 'Mr. Show' (1995-1998)

"I'd done sketch shows," Bob Odenkirk would say later about the origins of Mr. Show. "But I'd never done them right, the way I'd wanted to." An outgrowth of L.A.'s D.I.Y. alt-comedy scene percolating at places like UnCabaret, David Cross and Odenkirk's HBO series was to Nineties humor what the original SNL was to Seventies counterculture: a blast of cutting-edge irreverence that captured a moment. Which isn't to say the skits feel dated (though a familiarity with the era's shock rockers, Gen-X nostalgia and reality TV doesn't hurt). It's more about the way the duo took the same rip-it-up sensibility of the movement's stand-up and ad hoc stage performances to TV. "The network wanted to know what would be the same each week," Odenkirk recalls. "'Well, [we'll] come out and say 'Hi.' And that's it."

Once the guy in the suit and the dude in the slacker uniform came out for their introduction, all bets were off: An extended skit about cults might flow into a commercial for a cock-ring warehouse or a documentary on old-timey megaphone singers. It was comedy as college rock that got signed to a major label; and, for four seasons, a generation felt like it had a Monty Python to call its own. "A lot of people who listen to this show," Marc Maron told Odenkirk on his WTF podcast, "and a lot of what has become this 'comedy nerd' audience really sees Mr. Show as the starting place of modern comedy. I talk about it on this show, that I know there's a lot of people listening whose sense of comedy history starts at Mr. Show and beyond that, there's nothing. I mean, the impact that thing had was incredible."

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