Floyd Mayweather Took an Illegal IV Before Pacquiao Fight, Report Says

Mayweather allegedly given intravenous injection banned by World Anti-Doping Agency on the eve of his biggest bout

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Floyd Mayweather Jr.
Floyd Mayweather Jr. before his fight with Manny Pacquiao in Las Vegas. Al Bello/Getty

UPDATE: Floyd Mayweather has denied any wrongdoing, issuing a statement that reads, in part: "I did not commit any violations of the Nevada or USADA drug testing guidelines. I follow and have always followed the rules of Nevada and USADA, the gold-standard of drug testing."

With just days to go before he steps in the ring with Andre Berto, Floyd Mayweather's last fight is once again making headlines.

According to SB Nation, Mayweather was administered an IV drip containing mixtures of saline and Vitamin C to combat dehydration the day before his bout with Manny Pacquiao. While the substances themselves aren't banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency – in fact, the United States Anti-Doping Agency was reportedly aware of his activities following a random drug test on May 1 – it is against the organization's rules to administer them intravenously, since that can "dilute or mask the presence of another substance."

For that reason, fighters aren't allowed more than 50 milliliters of intravenous infusion per six hours unless a serious medical procedure calls for it. The mixtures Mayweather took the night before the fight were in excess of 700 milliliters.

What's more, Mayweather reportedly received a therapeutic use exemption from the USADA 18 days after the record-breaking fight, an exemption they did not have to notify the Nevada State Athletic Commission about until it was retroactively approved, thanks to wording in a drug-testing contract signed by reps for both fighters – and one the Athletic Commission says the USADA didn't have the authority to issue.

"The [therapeutic use exemption] for Mayweather's IV – and the IV was administered at Floyd's house, not in a medical facility, and wasn't brought to our attention at the time – was totally unacceptable," Athletic Commission executive director Bob Bennett said. "I've made it clear to [USADA CEO] Travis Tygart that this should not happen again."

Ironically, Pacquiao tried to come to terms with Mayweather days before the fight on a $5 million penalty in case of a failed drug test. Mayweather declined, his rep calling it a "lame-ass attempt to generate publicity." Pacquiao also requested a legal shot to dull the pain in his torn rotator cuff, which he claims left his arm functioning at 60 percent, but the Nevada Athletic Commission wouldn't allow it because the USADA did not notify them of the request in a timely manner.

In other words: This is all shady as shit. Reportedly, of course. Mayweather has yet to comment on the matter.

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