Watch President Obama's First Facebook Video, on Climate Change

Obama discusses the importance of cutting carbon emissions while taking a stroll through Presidential Park

Hello, Facebook! I finally got my very own page. I hope you’ll think of this as a place where we can have real conversations about the most important issues facing our country – a place where you can hear directly from me, and share your own thoughts and stories. (You can expect some just-for-fun stuff, too.)I’m kicking it off by inviting you to take a walk with me in my backyard – something I try to do at the end of the day before I head in for dinner. I say this often, but that’s because it’s always at the front of my mind: We’ve got to preserve this beautiful planet of ours for our kids and grandkids. And that means taking serious steps to address climate change once and for all. Now, we've made a lot of progress to cut carbon pollution here at home, and we're leading the world to take action as well. But we’ve got to do more. In a few weeks, I’m heading to Paris to meet with world leaders about a global agreement to meet this challenge.I hope you'll join me in speaking out on climate change and educating your friends about why this issue is so important. At a time when nearly three in four adults online use Facebook, this feels like a great place to do it. Share your thoughts in the comments, and pass this message on to folks you think need to see it.If we're all in this together, I'm confident we can solve this and do right by future generations.

Posted by President Obama on Monday, November 9, 2015

President Obama became an official Facebook user Monday, joining the more than 1.55 billion people who are already members of the social network. Obama's handlers made up for lost time by adding all of his big life events: his birth in Hawaii (see that, birthers?), his wedding to Michelle in Chicago and his first and second inaugurations.

Obama's first actual post, though, was a video of him taking a stroll around a little known national park called Presidential Park, a.k.a. the White House grounds.

"A lot of what I do is just think about how I want to make sure that the beauty of this particular national park, but also national parks across the country and our planet, are going to be there for Malia, Sasha, their kids, their grandkids for generations to come," Obama says in the video.

One of the ways he hopes to do that, the president says, is by getting other nations to agree to take steps toward cutting emissions at the upcoming climate talks in Paris.

"Not only do I want future presidents to be able to take walks like this, I want to make sure that the American people are able to enjoy the incredible national parks, the incredible beauty, the mountains, the oceans that have been one of the greatest gifts that we've ever received," Obama says. "And I want to make sure that the whole world is able to pass on to future generations the God-given beauty of this planet."