Trump Buildings to Remove Name After Complaints

Residents at Manhattan's Trump Place began circulating petition after infamous 'Access Hollywood' tape

The three buildings at Trump Place will remove the president-elect's name after residents complained. Credit: The Washington Post/Getty

Donald Trump's name will be taken off the three luxury buildings at Trump Place after tenants signed a petition saying they did not want their home associated with the president-elect, Bloomberg reports.

Approximately 600 residents signed the petition, which began circulating after the release of a 2005 Access Hollywood tape in which Trump bragged about groping women without their consent. The buildings, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, will be renamed for their street addresses: 140, 160 and 180 Riverside Blvd. 

"We are assuming a more neutral building identity that will appeal to all current and future residents," said the Chicago-based landlord, Equity Residential. Spokesman Marty McKenna added that the company's contractual obligation to brand their buildings with the Trump Organization had ended, and that the landlord never paid the Trump Organization for use of the name.

"We're very pleased, people felt really good that they could do something," said Linda Gottlieb, who helped start the petition. "It was an empowering way to protest. It wasn't a random protest, it was a very specific protest."

While the Access Hollywood tape and Trump's disparaging remarks about numerous groups throughout the 2016 campaign spurred the petition, Trump Place residents admitted their decision to sign was partly fueled by embarrassment. "You know how it is in New York, everyone asks you where you live," Brian Dumont told The Associated Press. "And we found ourselves just recoiling."

While Trump's transition team did not immediately respond to the AP's request for comment, during a 60 Minutes interview Sunday, Trump said he was unconcerned with how his campaign might effect his personal brand. "I don't care about hotel occupancy," he said. "It's peanuts compared to what we're doing. Health care, making people better."