Faith No More Talk Success, Split, Scars and 'Sol Invictus'

'You need scars; you need experience; you need to know where you went right and, maybe, wrong,' says drummer Mike Bordin

Faith No More Talk Success, Split, Scars and 'Sol Invictus'

In May, Faith No More cemented their return after a 15-year hiatus, and several more on the reunion-tour circuit, with Sol Invictus, the group's first LP since 1997's Album of the Year. In a new interview with Rolling Stone, drummer Mike Bordin and keyboardist Roddy Bottum discuss the group's remarkable rise, breakup and future.

The San Francisco band broke in the mid-Eighties with the success of their debut, We Care A Lot, and its titular opener, which gained traction on Los Angeles radio. Per Bottum, Faith No More spent the next 12 years living, traveling and working together: "That period of time was super, super intense."

Eventually, the entire group determined a break was necessary, and for the next 15 years, they members kept busy with various other projects. It was Bottum's wedding, seven years ago, that finally brought several members back into the same physical space.

"It was like just like, 'Wow, we have such a tie to each other' — without even saying anything, that was just apparent," Bottum says. "And that sort of set a weird groundwork for where we went after that."

Fittingly, Bottum says Sol Invictus was inspired by the band's past and what initially drew them to making music. But its creation owes as well to the band's own maturation.

"And those scars, man," says Bordin. "You need scars; you need experience; you need to know where you went right and, maybe, wrong. What you could do better, or different, and to be able to revisit different things, and be able to do that on our own terms."