Bob Seger Brings Country-Tinged 'All of the Roads' to 'Letterman'

Detroit rocker talks about Motown, the age of his crowds and the origins of "the Silver Bullet Band" with late-night host

Bob Seger and his Silver Bullet Band visited the Late Show With David Letterman Monday to perform the rocker's country-flavored single "All of the Roads" off his latest LP Ride Out. In addition to the performance, Seger sat down to chat with the late night host about his band's name, Motown and the average age of the crowd on Seger's most recent tour.

Seger first talked about being a 21-year-old Detroit rocker in the age of Motown. "One New Year's Eve, it was really a thrill, I was in a room with Stevie Wonder, the Four Tops, Diana Ross and the Supremes, and they're all practicing and singing, Stevie was playing his harmonica. It was pretty heady," Seger said. The "Against the Wind" singer also revealed that Motown once tried to sign him to a record contract but he instead inked a deal with Capitol.

Seger also told Letterman about the origin of the name "the Silver Bullet Band." "We were all arguing about what our band name should be, and I was kind of letting the band pick it themselves, and they just kept arguing and arguing," Seger says. "Finally, our manager sent us our paychecks with 'Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band' on it. He got tired of waiting for us so he made it up himself." Letterman then says he (incorrectly) heard that the band took its moniker from a silver-painted stretch limousine.

Seger's Letterman performance comes just days before the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer performs at New York's Madison Square Garden. His Ride Out Tour runs through early March.