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song reviews

September 3, 1970

Jimi Hendrix

Stepping Stone/Izabella

"Stepping Stone" b/w "Izabella"Hendrix Band of GypsysReprise0905 Now here's a hot little item that's only a few months old, released before the Capitol album and a dozen times as good. Hendrix and the guys rocket through "Stepping Stone" with its outrageous lyrics ("You're all woman – at least you taste like you are") and ever-increasing tempo, culminating in a frenzied guitar solo which ends with the engineer breaking in and saying "You made it!" Indeed. "Izabella" ain&... | More »

Fleetwood Mac

World in Harmony

Why Reprise is pushing a klunker like "Manalishi" is beyond me. It's another of those aimless heavy things that goes nowhere. "World," on the other hand, is a beautiful instrumental, featuring placid guitar work through several tempo changes, sounding very much like a world in harmony. This recording, incidentally, was made before guitarist Peter Green left. It is unlikely that it'll ever be on an album. This story is from the September 3rd, 1970 issue of Rolling Stone. | More »

Fleetwood Mac

The Green Manalishi

Why Reprise is pushing a klunker like "Manalishi" is beyond me. It's another of those aimless heavy things that goes nowhere. "World," on the other hand, is a beautiful instrumental, featuring placid guitar work through several tempo changes, sounding very much like a world in harmony. This recording, incidentally, was made before guitarist Peter Green left. It is unlikely that it'll ever be on an album. This story is from the September 3rd, 1970 issue of Rolling Stone. | More »

April 30, 1970

The Who

"The Seeker"

With "The Seeker" Pete Townshend and the Who take that proverbial one step backwards. A subdued (for the Who) rock and roller that gives the impression of having slightly more muscle than it shows, "The Seeker" addresses itself to the futility of seeking The Answer (which, we are informed, neither Bobby Dylan, the Beatles, or even Timothy Leary has to bestow). Built around a rather familiar rock riff and employing a typically obvious change to hook in its chorus, it's highlighted instru... | More »

July 11, 1969

The Rolling Stones

"You Can't Always Get What You Want"

"Honky Tonk Women" would have made a great twenty minute cut on the Stones' new album; as it is this disc is most likely the strongest three minutes of rock and roll yet released in 1969. It deserves twenty minutes because the Stones give us just the most tantalizing taste of everything they do well, of everything they do the best. In spite of Mick's screaming, joyful singing, this time the star of the show is Keith Richards. He combines the cleanest, toughest guitar lines in rock w... | More »

The Rolling Stones

"Honky Tonk Women"

"Honky Tonk Women" would have made a great twenty minute cut on the Stones' new album; as it is this disc is most likely the strongest three minutes of rock and roll yet released in 1969. It deserves twenty minutes because the Stones give us just the most tantalizing taste of everything they do well, of everything they do the best. In spite of Mick's screaming, joyful singing, this time the star of the show is Keith Richards. He combines the cleanest, toughest guitar lines in rock w... | More »

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Song Stories

“You Oughta Know”

Alanis Morissette | 1995

This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

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