.

Britney Spears

"Ooh La La"

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
10
June 24, 2013

Spears' splashiest recent singles — “Til the World Ends,” “I Wanna Go” and the Will.i.am collaboration “Scream & Shout” — have all been overpowering electro-shocks unleashed on the dancefloor, with her voice mutating into mythic shapes over planet-size beats. Her newest (produced by Dr. Luke, Ammo and Cirkut) is another big Euro-house escapade (complete with a stomping bit before the chorus where she and a cheerleader army of micro-Brits promise to “turn it up till the speakers pop”). But the song, cut for the soundtrack to The Smurfs 2, is mainly noteworthy for how airy and open it feels; Spears’ voice during the verses is lithe and uncluttered, the melody is carried by a breezy acoustic guitar and the chorus (“come with me be my ooh la la”) is one of her gentlest bubblegum innuendos. If the gear-shifting structure assures the song never quite hits lift-off, being underpowered is okay. This is Britney as summer breeze, blowing through the wind tunnel of our mind.

10
prev
Song Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Santa Monica”

    Everclear | 1996

    After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com