.

Weezer

"Memories"

Rolling Stone: star rating
Community: star rating
5 3 0
August 12, 2010

It's odd how Rivers Cuomo and Eminem always seem to drop new records at the same time. They both represent a lost golden era to their fanboy cult, and they get knee-jerk hostility from the same Stans who wildly overrated them 10 years ago. But the rest of the world still likes them as much as ever. "Memories," the first single from the forthcoming Hurley, is a clever goof that skewers the Weezer cult by making fun of Nineties nostalgia. Over a chugging groove built on synths and power chords, Cuomo (who turned 40 in June) recalls "Pissin' in plastic cups before we went onstage/Playin' Hacky Sack back when Audioslave was still Rage." Now that Cuomo is a full-fledged adult charged with changing diapers and buying the family groceries, he's dreaming of the old days when people liked techno music, and he delivers the singalong chorus ("Memories make me want to go back there") with enough passion to make you think he's not entirely joking.

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