.

Song Stories

“West End Girls”

Pet Shop Boys | 1984

Chris Lowe and Neil Tennant's worldwide Number One single evolved from Lowe watching a Jimmy Cagney gangster film and, as Lowe recalled, "Just as I was dropping off to sleep, into my head popped the song's opening line, 'Sometimes you're better off dead/There's gun in your hand and it's pointed at your head.' I thought, 'That's quite good.'" The Pet Shop Boys loved Grandmaster Flash's hip-hop track "The Message" and decided to take a stab at rapping themselves. "So I wrote a rap fallen on from those lines 'Sometimes you're better off dead,'" Lowe said, which he debuted in the song's intro.

prev
Song Stories Main Next

Song Stories

“Hungry Like the Wolf”

Duran Duran | 1982

This indulgent New Romantic group generated their first U.S. hit with the help of what was at the time new technology. "Simon [Le Bon] and I, I think, had been out the night before and had this terrible hangover," said keyboardist Nick Rhodes. "For some reason we were feeling guilty about it and decided to go and do some work." Rhodes started playing with his Jupiter-8 synth, and then "Simon had an idea for a lyric, and by lunchtime when everyone else turned up, we pretty much had the song." The Simmons drumbeat was equally important to the sound of "Hungry Like the Wolf," as Duran Duran drummer Roger Taylor stated it "kind of defined the drum sound for the Eighties."

More Song Stories entries »
www.expandtheroom.com