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Song Stories

“Marquee Moon”

Television | 1977

That Television knocked out this 10-minute punk masterpiece in a single take underscores the raw, warts-and-all New York 1970s underground aesthetic. In many ways, "Marquee Moon" was the anti-song: It ran long, it lacked a chorus, it defied melody and, perhaps most telling, it never charted. Yet Television captured a beauty, its anarchic structure built on Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd's dueling electric-guitar jangle. It was disciplined disorder, and drummer Billy Ficca assumed the band was only rehearsing. When producer Andy Johns suggested another take, Verlaine refused. "I said, 'Forget it,'" he told Rolling Stone.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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