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Song Stories

“Goodbye to Love”

The Carpenters | 1972

"The Carpenters" and "fuzz guitar solo" are two phrases that do not exactly go hand in hand. But for one brief moment, the two coexisted merrily in the soft-rock universe. The title "Goodbye to Love" came from a fictional tune mentioned, but never heard, in the 1940 film Rhythm on the River, but session guitarist Tony Peluso's hard-rock solo was anything but old-fashioned. "I'm thinking: 'What would be right?' I played something that was very soft and easy; I tried to stay out of the way," Peluso said. "Richard [Carpenter] said, 'No, no, no, not like that. Play the melody for five bars and then burn it up! Soar off into the stratosphere. Go for it!'"

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Song Stories

“Hungry Like the Wolf”

Duran Duran | 1982

This indulgent New Romantic group generated their first U.S. hit with the help of what was at the time new technology. "Simon [Le Bon] and I, I think, had been out the night before and had this terrible hangover," said keyboardist Nick Rhodes. "For some reason we were feeling guilty about it and decided to go and do some work." Rhodes started playing with his Jupiter-8 synth, and then "Simon had an idea for a lyric, and by lunchtime when everyone else turned up, we pretty much had the song." The Simmons drumbeat was equally important to the sound of "Hungry Like the Wolf," as Duran Duran drummer Roger Taylor stated it "kind of defined the drum sound for the Eighties."

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