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Song Stories

“Goodbye to Love”

The Carpenters | 1972

"The Carpenters" and "fuzz guitar solo" are two phrases that do not exactly go hand in hand. But for one brief moment, the two coexisted merrily in the soft-rock universe. The title "Goodbye to Love" came from a fictional tune mentioned, but never heard, in the 1940 film Rhythm on the River, but session guitarist Tony Peluso's hard-rock solo was anything but old-fashioned. "I'm thinking: 'What would be right?' I played something that was very soft and easy; I tried to stay out of the way," Peluso said. "Richard [Carpenter] said, 'No, no, no, not like that. Play the melody for five bars and then burn it up! Soar off into the stratosphere. Go for it!'"

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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