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Readers' Poll: The 10 Greatest Who Albums

Your picks include 'Live at Leeds,' 'Tommy' and 'Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy'
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Courtesy Polydor Records

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10. 'Who Are You'

The Who were in the worst shape of their 15-year career when they began work on Who Are You in late 1977. Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey had taken nasty swipes at each other in the press in recent years, and Keith Moon was a severe drug addict. He was just 32, but he looked a good decade older. The punk revolution was also sweeping England, threatening to make bands like the Who seem like dinosaurs.

Pete Townshend was determined to see his band survive, though the Who Are You opening track "New Song" acknowledges his tough task: "I write the same old song with a few new lines/ And everybody wants to hear it." The title track reflects on a drunken night with members of the Sex Pistols where he did actually pass out in a Soho doorway, while "Music Must Change" also acknowledges the changing musical landscape. "But is this song so different?" Townshend wonders. "Am I doing it all again?" Despite his doubts, the album was a huge success – but less than two weeks after it hit shelves, Keith Moon was dead. Ironically, he's posed on the cover sitting in a chair that reads "Not To Be Taken Away." 

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