.

Yoko Ono and D.M.C. Team to Fight World Hunger

Fifth annual campaign focuses on Sandy victims

Yoko Ono and Darryl 'D.M.C.' McDaniels at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York City on November 19, 2012
Laura Cavanaugh/FilmMagic
November 20, 2012 11:55 AM ET

Yoko Ono and Run-D.M.C.'s Darryl McDaniels were joined by young Hurricane Sandy victims at the Hard Rock Cafe in Midtown Manhattan Monday to mark the fifth annual Imagine There's No Hunger campaign, which combats childhood hunger and poverty.

"I know what it means to be hungry," Ono told Rolling Stone. "In the Second World War, I was a little girl. I was evacuated in my country. We were very hungry. I just don't want the children to have that experience."

For the past five years, Ono has lent her support to the WhyHunger organization, which works on the grassroots level in 15 countries to feed more than 5 million kids. The group also teaches families to be self-sustaining by growing their own food.

Serving as an artist ambassador for the campaign this year was D.M.C., who traveled to Kenya to witness firsthand how the WhyHunger program assists children in need.

"They're teaching these young people how to grow their own food. It makes a lot of sense," D.M.C. told Rolling Stone. "If I eat, you should eat too, which is why we created hip-hop in the Bronx, many years ago.

"Afrika Bambaataa and the Zulu Nation looked around and said, 'We gotta stop killing each other, fighting for corners and streets. Let's do something creatively, where everybody could eat.' We were young people who took it upon ourselves to do it."

After the recent devastation from Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey, the campaign decided to donate some of the proceeds to victims of the storm. On hand Monday were members of the Added Value organization in Red Hook, Brooklyn, whose community farm was devastated by the storm.

"They got wiped out," said Bill Ayres, Executive Director of WhyHunger. "Their infrastructure got wiped out. Their crop got wiped out. So we're going to help them."

As an appropriate salute, the Times Square Alliance has decided to promote the Imagine campaign during their New Year's festivitie. They play John Lennon's "Imagine" just before the ball drops at midnight every year.

"It's a moment when everyone takes a deep breath," said Tim Tompkins, president of the alliance. "It's what New Year's is about – hope for the future. People imagine a better life for themselves and for others."

The "whole purpose" of Lennon's iconic song, said D.M.C., is "everything we can imagine can come true. I sat in my basement – 'Imagine if I'd be the king of rock one day, one of the greatest MCs ever.' Boom!"

For Ono as well, "Imagine" serves as an inspiration and a call to action, even after all that's taken place since its inception in 1971.

"There's been incredible progress," she said. "Each person wants to do something on their own. I hope that we will find a way to get together – in our minds, even – and really create a beautiful future for us."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com