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Xzibit Talks ‘Napalm,’ Song Featuring Late Mother And Exiting MTV

January 31, 2013 2:30 PM ET
Xzibit
Xzibit
Billy Johnson, Jr.

Veteran hip-hop artist Xzibit discussed his latest album, Napalm, during a recent appearance on Yahoo! Music’s The Aftermath series, the best music discussion on the ‘net.

Keeping true to the Napalm title, X-to-the-Z actually shot ta music video for the album in Iraq. X offers details about filming the short in Saddam Hussein’s palace Victory Over America. 

The Napalm album also has special meaning for X because it includes the song “1983” that features his late mother, Trena Joiner. 1983 is the year his mother died. On the song, Joiner, a former poet, is heard sharing her philosophies on life and parenting. Xzibit breaks her speech-like talk into excerpts and inserts between them his own conversational narratives.

X also puts in context the song’s jab at MTV for its handling of his former show, Pimp My Ride. He accuses the network of playing him like a “mockery.”

X additionally shares some of the advice he’s given his eldest son, Tremaine, who is budding rapper Tre Capital.

Video and editing: Robert Gardner

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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