.

Willie Nelson Statue to Be Erected in Austin

Bronze cast will be unveiled at 4:20 p.m. on 4/20

April 10, 2012 1:25 PM ET
willie nelson
Willie Nelson performs during Farm Aid in Kansas City, Kansas.
Timothy Hiatt/Getty Images

A bronze sculpture of Willie Nelson will be erected later this month in Austin, Texas. The statue, a gift to the city from the non-profit group Capital Area Statues, Inc., will be unveiled at 4:20 p.m. on April 20th as a nod to the country star's reputation as a stoner.

The eight-foot tall, one-ton bronze statue was created by sculptor Clete Shields. "Creating a sculpture of such an icon while he is still living presents its challenges," Shields said in a statement. "For many, the Willie they connect with is the Outlaw Willie of the Seventies, or the influential advocate for Farm Aid in the Eighties, while others – especially a younger generation – grew fond of him during his more mature years. The sculpture needed to appeal to a broad audience and conjure up the fond memories of so many different people."

The unveiling event will include an appearance by Nelson himself, who will be in town to perform at ACL Live at the Moody Theatre as part of the We Walk the Line show celebrating the music of Johnny Cash.

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