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Wilco to Self-Release 'The Whole Love' in September

The band's 8th album will be the first release on their new dBpm label

June 29, 2011 4:35 PM ET
Wilco to Self-Release 'The Whole Love' in September

Wilco are set to self-release their eighth studio album The Whole Love on September 27th. The disc will be the first full-length record released by their brand new label dBpm. When Rolling Stone checked in with frontman Jeff Tweedy earlier this year, he said that the band recorded 20 songs for what has turned out to be a concise 12-cut album. This represents the best of a period in which Tweedy penned up to 60 new tunes. "It's a pretty great time for me writing-wise," he said.

Photos: Backstage with Wilco

The Whole Love includes the band's new garage rock-inspired single "I Might," as well as a seven-minute track, "Art of Almost," which starts with shadowy electronics, gently turns into a haunted vocal section, then sprints into a Krautrock-style blowout. Other numbers, such as spectral ballad "Black Moon" and the jaunty title track, call back to the group's roots in country rock.

You can check out the full track listing for The Whole Love below.

"Art of Almost"
"I Might"
"Sunloathe"
"Dawned on Me"
"Black Moon"
"Born Alone"
"Open Mind"
"Capitol City"
"Standing O"
"Rising Red Lung"
"Whole Love"
"One Sunday Morning (Song for Jane Smiley's Boyfriend)"

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