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WikiLeaks Releases 'Beat the Blockade' Benefit CD

Proceeds will fight financial institutions' decision to stop processing payments to site

June 29, 2012 3:05 PM ET
julian assange
Oli Scarff/Getty Images

WikiLeaks announced today that they are releasing their first CD, Beat the Blockade.

According to a statement, the disc features "12 cool and inspiring songs about the struggles of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, Bradley Manning and Anonymous." The tunes were donated by politically charged artists such as English rapper Dan Bull ("WikiLeaks and the Need for Free Speech") and singer-songwriters like David Rovics ("Song for Bradley Manning") and Erick Nova ("Bradley's Song").

The compilation gets its title from the decision of several American financial institutions – including Bank of America, Visa, MasterCard, Western Union and PayPal – to stop processing payments to WikiLeaks. As the group said in their statement, this is preventing people from donating to a cause they support.

"WikiLeaks is currently fighting the blockade in lawsuits around the world," it reads. "The blockade is entirely political and was erected without any legal or administrative process whatsoever."

All proceeds from Beat the Blockade – available as a downloadable CD for $11.99 and as a "Supporter Version" for $24.99 – will go to WikiLeaks and the Bradley Manning Defense Fund.

The CD, however, does not feature any contributions from M.I.A., who provided the soundtrack for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's recent TV show, The World Tomorrow.

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