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Why Foreigner’s ‘I Want to Know What Love Is’ Works as Gospel

Courtesy of Music/Motown Gospel/ Mars
October 2, 2013 4:30 PM ET

Here's a challenge for a couple contemporary R&B and gospel singers – turn Foreigner's 1984 No. 1 Brit-pop ballad "I Want To Know What Love Is" into a church song.

The task apparently came easy for Ruben Studdard and Le'Andria Johnson, who mastered the art of covering songs during their successful stints on singing competitions "American Idol" and "Sunday's Best."

Ruben and Le'Andria perform the song as a spirit-filled duet for Paul Porter's album F.R.E.E. and Yahoo Music has the exclusive audio premiere.

Even though the original features backing vocals from the New Jersey Mass Choir, Paul, Ruben and Le'Andria stamp their version with downhome Baptist soul.

Le'Andria's verse is especially fitting as a faith-based message. She sings, "Now this mountain I must climb. Feels like a world upon my shoulders. And though the clouds I see love shine. It keeps me warm as life grows colder."

F.R.E.E. will be released on Oct. 29 on Tre'Myles Music/Motown Gospel/ Mars and features production from Blac Elvis and Harold Lilly, who has worked with Beyoncé, Jamie Foxx and Fergie.

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