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Why Eminem Defends Friendship With ‘The Monster’ on Rihanna Collab

October 28, 2013 5:30 PM ET
Why Eminem Defends Friendship With ‘The Monster’ on Rihanna Collab
Courtesy of Shady Records

Eminem's new song "Monster" could be considered a PSA for mental health.

On the song bustling with electric rock guitars and heavy drum snares, the Detroit rapper discusses being influenced by voices he hears in his head. He refers to the voices as the monster under his bed.

Rihanna, who also teamed with Eminem for the 2010 hit "Love The Way You Lie," sings the chorus, "I'm friends with the monster that's under my bed/ Get along with the voices inside of my head/ Keep tryin' to save me/ Stop holding your breath/ And you think I'm crazy/ Well that's not fair."

Throughout the song, Eminem describes his struggle to feel normal. "Going cuckoo and kookie as Kook Keith, but I'm actually weirder than you think," he rhymes.

He even asks his listeners not to judge him. "I'm just relaying what the voice in my head's saying," he raps. "Don't shoot the monster."

He admits that he knows his admission will be hard to grasp for some. "Maybe I need a straight jacket for real, but I'm OK with that. It's nothing," he says.

The song received an explosive response via Twitter:

The song appears on his "MMLP2" album out on November 5.

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