.

Who Album Banned on New York Radio

The perpetrator: the same music director who took Hendrix off the air

February 10, 1968
John Entwistle with a bikini-clad model in a spoof advertisement made for the cover of the album 'The Who Sell Out.'
John Entwistle with a bikini-clad model in a spoof advertisement made for the cover of the album 'The Who Sell Out.'
David Montgomery/Getty Images

Radio WMCA, the number one pop station in New York, has banned the new The Who Sell Out from airplay. Music Director Joe Bogart calls the album "disgusting!" and adds "I have grave doubts about anyone who would play it. I won't even let my children see the cover." It was Bogart who last summer saw Jimi Hendrix at a Central Park Love-In and took the performer's record off the air for similar reasons. Hendrix's record sales survived the blow, however.

Bogart's action follows no specific policy set forth by the New York station concerning censorship. His actions rather contradict a statement made by Ruth Meyer, General Manager of WMCA earlier this year. At a radio programming conference held in Las Vegas Miss Meyer stated to an all male audience attending a seminar on radio management: "We don't screw our audience; we make love to them." Her statements suggest a more liberal policy for WMCA than Bogart's action would imply.

Presently, no statement has been issued by Miss Meyer or station owner R. Peter Strauss, who has been known for his civil libertarian views. New York audiences will have to do without the Who for a while, at least from WMCA.

This story is from the February 10th, 1968 issue of Rolling Stone.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Vicious”

Lou Reed | 1972

Opening Lou Reed's 1972 solo album, the hard-riffing "Vicious" actually traces its origin back to Reed's days with the Velvet Underground. Picking up bits and pieces of songs from the people and places around him, and filing his notes for later use, Reed said it was Andy Warhol who provided fuel for the song. "He said, 'Why don't you write a song called 'Vicious,'" Reed told Rolling Stone in 1989. "And I said, 'What kind of vicious?' 'Oh, you know, vicious like I hit you with a flower.' And I wrote it down literally."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com