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Whitney Houston's Final Movie Set for August Release

Late singer recorded new songs for 'Sparkle' remake

February 13, 2012 8:40 AM ET
Whitney Houston performs at the 2009 Grammy Salute to Industry Icons honoring Clive Davis.
Whitney Houston performs at the 2009 Grammy Salute to Industry Icons honoring Clive Davis.
Lester Cohen/WireImage

Sparkle, a musical drama featuring the final film role of Whitney Houston, is now scheduled to hit theaters on August 17th. The movie, a remake of the 1976 picture of the same name, features Houston as the mother of three sisters in a Supremes-like musical group who struggle with fame and drugs. The movie also includes performances by Jordin Sparks, Cee Lo Green and Mike Epps.

In addition to starring in the film, Houston recorded several songs for its soundtrack, which was intended as a comeback project for the troubled superstar. The release date for the soundtrack is not yet established, but it seems safe to assume that Houston's final recordings will hit stores sometime this summer.

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