.

Whitney Houston Drowned with Cocaine in Her System, Autopsy Reveals

Report says singer died of accidental drowning, but drugs were a factor

March 22, 2012 6:39 PM ET
whitney houston
Whitney Houston performs in Milan.
Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images

Whitney Houston's official cause of death was accidental drowning, according to an initial report from the L.A. County Coroner released Thursday, but a heart condition and cocaine use were also contributing factors.

The autopsy report reveals that Houston suffered from atherosclerotic heart disease, or a hardening of the arteries. The amount of cocaine found in her system will not be made public until the coroner's final report is released in two weeks.

Marijuana, Xanax, Benadryl and the muscle relaxant Flexeril were also found in Houston's system, but those drugs did not contribute to her death, the report says.

Houston's family has issued a public statement in reponse to the autopsy findings through Patricia Houston, the singer's sister-in-law and former manager. "We are saddened to learn of the toxicology results, although we are glad to now have closure," reads the statement.

Houston died at the Beverly Hills Hotel on February 11th, one day prior to the Grammy Awards.

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