.

'White Album' Sleeve Designer Dies at 89

British artist Richard Hamilton often called the 'Father of Pop Art'

September 14, 2011 12:05 PM ET
richard hamilton pop art beatles
Richard Hamilton around 1970
Tony Evans/Timelapse Library Ltd/Getty

Richard Hamilton, the "Father of Pop Art" who designed the Beatles' iconic White Album cover, died yesterday in England at age 89.

Hamilton's art collages of the 1950s directly inspired Sir Peter Blake, who created the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper cover. For his own design for the blank White Album cover and the collage-style poster inside, Hamilton claimed to have been paid the equivalent of $316.

He was closely associated with the Swinging London of the 1960s. One of his well-known paintings depicted Mick Jagger and art dealer Robert Fraser handcuffed together in the back of a police car. As a teacher, one of his art students was Bryan Ferry of Roxy Music. Hamilton is often credited as one of the original pop artists, as well as the coiner of the phrase.  

Related
The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time: The Beatles, The White Album

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Road to Nowhere”

Talking Heads | 1985

A cappella harmonies give way to an a fuller arrangement blending pop and electro-disco on "Road to Nowhere," but the theme remains constant: We're on an eternal journey to an undefined destination. The song vaulted back into the news a quarter century after it was a hit when Gov. Charlie Crist used it in his unsuccessful 2010 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Florida. "It's this little ditty about how there's no order and no plan and no scheme to life and death and it doesn't mean anything, but it's all right," Byrne said with a chuckle.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com