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Weekend Rock: What's the Best Hard Rock/Metal Album of the Seventies?

Cast your vote in our weekly poll

August 23, 2013 3:00 PM ET
Black Sabbath, 'Paranoid,' Led Zeppelin, 'IV,' AC/DC, 'Highway To Hell,'  Deep Purple, 'Machine Head.'
Black Sabbath 'Paranoid,' Led Zeppelin 'IV,' AC/DC 'Highway to Hell,' Deep Purple 'Machine Head'
Courtesy of Vertigo Records; Courtesy of Atlantic Records; Courtesy of Atlantic Records; Courtesy of EMI Records

Back in the 1970s, the terms "heavy metal" and "hard rock" were often used interchangeably. Groups such as Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC and even Motorhead and Judas Priest were all lumped together. It was only in the Eighties that the labels became more clear, especially after the rise of thrash metal. 

Our question for you this week: What is your favorite hard rock/heavy metal album of the Seventies? Vote for whatever album you want, just as long as it came out sometime during that decade. We'll accept LPs by Aerosmith, Kiss, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Van Halen, Blue Oyster Cult, Thin Lizzy, Alice Cooper and pretty much any other album by an act reasonable people consider hard rock or heavy metal. Just please only vote once and only for a single album.  

You can vote here in the comments, on facebook.com/rollingstone or on Twitter using the hashtag #weekendrock. 

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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