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Weekend Rock Question: What Is the Greatest Rock Movie of All Time?

Cast your vote in our weekly poll

'Walk the Line', 'This is Spinal Tap', 'School of Rock'
Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox; Courtesy of Paramount Pictures; Courtesy of StudioCanal
January 18, 2013 3:00 PM ET

David Chase's Sixties rock & roll movie Not Fade Away went into wide release this month. It's the first movie from the creator of The Sopranos. We figured this was a good time to poll our readers to determine their favorite rock movie. This can be pretty much any movie with a rock theme, as long as it's scripted – no documentaries. 

Feel free to vote for biopics (Walk the Line, Ray), movies focusing on fictional rock bands (Eddie and the Cruisers, Almost Famous) or any other movie about rock & roll (School of Rock, High Fidelity.) Once again, just avoid documentaries like The Last Waltz or Woodstock. That's a whole other poll. Mockumentaries, such as This Is Spinal Tap and Meet the Rutles, are fair game, however.  

Vote for whatever movie you want, but please only vote once and only for a single movie. We'll know something's up if we see 800 votes for Eddie and the Cruisers II: Eddie Lives. 

You can vote here in the comments, on facebook.com/Rollingstone or on Twitter using the #weekendrock hashtag.

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Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

Otis Redding | 1966

This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
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