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Weekend Rock Question: What Is the Best Prog Rock Album of the 1970s?

Cast your vote in our weekly poll

August 16, 2013 4:25 PM ET
Rush, '2112,' Pink Floyd, 'Animals,' Genesis, 'The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway,' Yes, 'Tales From Topographic Oceans.'
Rush, '2112,' Pink Floyd, 'Animals,' Genesis, 'The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway,' Yes, 'Tales From Topographic Oceans.'
Courtesy of Mercury Records; Courtesy of Columbia Records; Courtesy of Virgin Records; Courtesy of Atlantic Records

Prog rock has been around for four decades, but most people feel the genre reached its peak in the 1970s. King Crimson's debut LP hit in October of 1969, and that breakthrough album inspired everyone from Yes to Genesis to Rush over the next ten years.

Now we have a question for you: What is your favorite prog rock album of the 1970s? There's no solid definition of prog rock, so you're going to have to define it yourself. (Note: Some of their albums are on the bubble, but we're gonna count everything Pink Floyd did that decade.)  

You can vote here in the comments, on facebook.com/rollingstone or on Twitter using the hashtag #weekend rock. 

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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