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Weekend Rock Question: What Is Stevie Wonder's Best Song?

Cast your vote in our weekly poll

Stevie Wonder performs in Denver, Colorado.
Dennis Chamberlin/The Denver Post via Getty Images
November 1, 2013 3:30 PM ET

This week, Stevie Wonder announced plans to perform his 1976 masterpiece Songs in the Key of Life at a Los Angeles benefit gig on December 21st. "The album has just inspired me," he told Rolling Stone. "I listen to [it to] measure how I feel and how I see the world – how it is now as to how it was then, how much has or hasn't changed." 

Find Out Where Stevie Wonder Ranks in Our List of the 100 Greatest Artists

Now we have a question for you: What is Stevie Wonder's single greatest song? There are a ton to choose from, going all the way back to "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)" in 1963 through his incredible run of 1970s hits like "Higher Ground" and "Superstition" to MTV-era jams like "Part-Time Lover" and "Ribbon in the Sky." Vote for whatever Stevie Wonder song you want, but please only vote once and only for a single song. 

You can vote here in the comments, on facebook.com/rollingstone or on Twitter using the hashtag #weekend rock.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

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