.

Week in Rock History: U2 Releases Debut EP

Page 2 of 2

September 1, 1984: Tina Turner reaches Number One with "What's Love Got to Do With It?"
Tina Turner rose to fame throughout the 1960s and 1970s in the Ike and Tina Turner Revue, a rock and R&B combo with her abusive then-husband, Ike Turner. Her sexy outfits and dynamic stage persona made her an international star, and the couple released many enduring hits: "A Fool in Love", "River Deep, Mountain High" and their ecstatic cover of Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Proud Mary."

Tina left Ike because of spousal abuse and drug addiction while the couple was in the middle of their 1976 tour. She fled with almost no money and spent the next several years attempting to rebuild her life and her career. In 1984, she released Private Dancer, her fifth studio album and one of the most remarkable comebacks in rock history. Its brazen single "What's Love Got to Do with It?" reached Number One on the Billboard charts, Turner's only song ever to do so; the album went five times platinum in the United States and netted four Grammys, giving Turner the solo superstardom she'd struggled so long to achieve.

August 30, 1988: Bruce Springsteen's wife files for divorce after tabloids reveal the singer's affair with his backing singer, Patti Scialfa
The Boss's first marriage, to model/actress Julianne Phillips, lasted less than four years, but it gave the music world plenty to gossip about. The union met its demise when tabloid newspapers ran photographs linking Springsteen romantically to his backing singer, Patti Scialfa.

Much of the ensuing media frenzy was directed toward the disparities between the two women, who could not have been more different. Phillips was a classically beautiful socialite of privileged upbringing; the older Scialfa was a laid-back Jersey girl who dressed in denim and harmonized along with the Boss's increasingly discontent lyrics. (It's rumored that "Tunnel of Love" was written about Phillips.)

Springsteen and Phillips divorced in March of 1989. Soon after, Scialfa gave birth to her first child with Springsteen; the musicians married the following year and are still together.

LAST WEEK: Aaliyah Killed in a Plane Crash

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Madame George”

Van Morrison | 1968

One of the first stream-of-consciousness epics to make it onto a Van Morrison record, his drawn-out farewell to the eccentric "Madame George" lasted nearly 10 minutes, combining ingredients from folk, jazz and classical music. The character that gave the song its title provoked speculation that it was about a drag queen, though Morrison denied this in Rolling Stone. "If you see it as a male or a female or whatever, it's your trip," he remarked. "I see it as a ... a Swiss cheese sandwich. Something like that."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com