Watch Rolling Stones Play 'She's a Rainbow' for First Time in 18 Years

Group kicked off 2016 tour in Chile and introduced new backup vocalist Sasha Allen

Watch the Rolling Stones play their 1967 tune "She's A Rainbow" live for the first time in 18 years

The Rolling Stones kicked off the South American leg of their ongoing world tour at Santiago, Chile's Estadio Nacional Wednesday night. Before the show, the band's official website asked fans to pick between four rarities –  "She's a Rainbow," "Anybody Seen My Baby," "She's So Cold" and "Like a Rolling Stone" – for the request portion of the evening. "She's a Rainbow" won the most votes, and six songs into the night, they played the 1967 Their Satanic Majesties Request tune for the first time since 1998, and only the 11th time in their entire history.

This was also their first show with new backup vocalist Sasha Allen, best known for her appearance on the fourth season of The Voice in 2013. "So glad first show is out of me now," she wrote on Twitter. "I can't wait to see it second to last!!! Growth.... Blessed to learn from the best!" Lisa Fischer has been the Stones' primary vocalist dating to the Steel Wheels tour in 1989, but she had prior touring commitments that prevented her from making the trip down to South America.

The Stones tour continues on February 7th with a three-night stand at Argentina's Estadio Unico and wraps up March 17th at Mexico City's Foro Sol. It's unclear what their plans are beyond that, but Keith Richards recently told Rolling Stone that he's open to the idea of playing more shows in the USA. "It wouldn't surprise me at all," he said. "Up to now, I've gotten as far as South America at the beginning of next year, and I know up to then. But after that, who knows? See how the boys feel."

The group also crammed in some studio time before heading down to South America, possibly paving the way for their first album since 2005's A Bigger Bang. "[I want to] find a good room somewhere and stuff us all in there together," Richards told Rolling Stone last year. "Put a few microphones in the right place, and away you go."