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Watch: Lost Michael Jackson Video

November 19, 2010 4:43 PM ET

 

A previously unreleased Michael Jackson video for his 2003 song "One More Chance" was posted on the singer's site Friday.

The R. Kelly-penned song was released as a single late that year and was featured on Jackson's Number Ones LP. The video is apparently unconnected to Michael, the album of previously unreleased material, out December 14.

Check Out All of Rolling Stone's coverage in "Michael Jackson Remembered."

The video was filmed primarily in Las Vegas in 2003 and wasn't completed, although Jackson approved the cut before it was shelved, according to his site. Presumably it was abandoned after the November 2003 raid on Jackson's Neverland Ranch by police investigating child-molestation accusations against the singer.

The clip features Jackson dancing and lip-synching in a theater, but, in a switch, he performs around (and on top of) tables while the audience stands on the stage. The song's mellow tempo keeps his dance moves calm until around the three-minute mark, when he cuts loose, bounding on tables, kicking over lamps and pulling some trademark spins and arms-outstretched gestures.

Just Added: Michael Jackson's One More Chance Video (full video) [MichaelJackson.com via Consequence of Sound]

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Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

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