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Watch: Coldplay Perform 'Christmas Lights' to Benefit Homeless Shelter

Plus, a holiday song from Sufjan Stevens and Odd Future's expletive-laden Christmas music

December 22, 2010 3:39 PM ET

Coldplay performed their new single "Christmas Lights" live for the first time over the weekend. The gig probably spread a lot of holiday cheer: It was a benefit to raise funds for a new homeless center in the British city of Liverpool. Watch above as the group is joined at the end of the song by Gary Barlow from Take That and Chris Martin's dad dressed as Elvis.

Sufjan Stevens also has a new holiday release — the latest in a series of annual Christmas albums that he makes for friends. Stevens joined The National's Aaron and Bryce Dessner and Arcade Fire's Richard Reed Perry for two songs from the album during their set on BBC Radio over the weekend. [Via Pitchfork]

A much more misanthropic holiday spirit can be found on "Fuck This Christmas" from the Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All collective. It is undoubtedly one of the few holiday songs in existence that features the words "Fuck Santa!" in the chorus. [Via Prefix]

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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