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Watch: Broken Bells Borrow Hall & Oates Video

Director cleverly adapts 'Private Eyes' clip

November 3, 2010 5:28 PM ET

Broken Bells' first video for "The Ghost Inside," starring Mad Men's Christina Hendricks, was a slice of space-age visual exotica that's too rarely seen in these axed-video-budget days. Now, the band has put together a second take on a video for the song couldn't be more different — but is equally awesome in its own way.

Director Matt McCormick has combined the song with Hall & Oates' 1981 video for "Private Eyes" (which is probably one of the clips former H&O manager was referring to in their Behind the Music episode when he said the band had "the worst videos on television") by perfectly superimposing Broken Bells singer James Mercer's mouth over Daryl Hall's. The effect is at once transfixing and, it must be said, hilarious.

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McCormick told Vulture that the handclap sounds in "The Ghost Inside" reminded him of "Private Eyes," so he "looked up the 'Private Eyes' video on YouTube and realized that song structure and tempo was pretty darn close to that of 'Ghost Inside,' and from there just started playing around with syncing up the visuals from the 'Private Eyes' video with 'The Ghost Inside.' "

"Playing around" indeed: watch the results for yourself!

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Song Stories

“Vans”

The Pack | 2006

Berkeley, California rappers the Pack made their footwear choice clear in 2006 with the song "Vans." The track caught the attention of Too $hort, who signed them to his imprint. MTV refused to play the video for the song, though, claiming it was essentially a commercial for the product. Rapper Lil' B disagreed. "I didn’t know nobody [at] Vans," he said. "I was just a rapper who wore Vans." Even without MTV's support, Lil' B recognized the impact of the track. "God blessed me with such a revolutionary song… People around my age know who really started a lot of the dressing people are into now."

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