Watch Bono, Halsey Recap Insanity of 2016 on 'Kimmel'

Two singers team with Herbie Hancock, update Cole Porter to raise money to fight AIDS

Bono, Halsey, and Herbie Hancock teamed up on 'Kimmel' during an episode dedicated to fundraising to battle AIDS.

Jimmy Kimmel Live! served as the launching pad for (Red)'s second annual (Shopathon), which raises money to fight AIDS, on Tuesday. A group of celebrities, including Julia Roberts, DJ Khaled, Channing Tatum, Neil Patrick Harris and Bono, are helping (Red)'s cause and appeared on Kimmel to discuss their commitment. Bono and Halsey also provided some laugh-through-your-tears comic relief, as they adapted an old Cole Porter tune with lyrics about the ups and downs of this year. As Bono put it: "Let's recall 2016, and all the nonsense we have seen." 

While a tuxedo-clad Herbie Hancock outlined a graceful melody on piano, Bono and Halsey exchanged terse lines. "Do you remember Pokémon?" Bono asked. "It was big for a month, but now it's gone." "Too soon," Halsey replied. "It's rough," U2's singer continued. "Never caught a squirtle or a jigglypuff."

The song also incorporated the demise of Vine, the Chicago Cubs' World Series victory, Bill Cosby's sexual assault allegations, Jon Snow's reincarnation in Game of Thrones and the difficulty of getting a ticket to the musical Hamilton. One topic was conspicuously absent: the presidential election. The two singers made only an oblique reference to Trump's victory as their duet came to a close: "Not to fear, we have it sorted/ Or maybe we'll just get deported."

Bono also took a moment to speak with Kimmel about (Red), which he presented as a rare instance of bipartisan agreement in a divided nation. "17 million people are alive because of people [on the] right and left of the aisle," Bono noted. "You don't think these things are possible in Washington, but we can actually work together."

Those who contribute to (Red)'s cause will be entered in a contest and have the chance to win a remarkable Bono-related experience: U2 will play a private show for one person and a guest. "We've played to 10 people once," Bono said. "In New York we played to 37 people. But to play for two people: that's going to pretty special for us."