.

Watch: A Tribe Called Quest Documentary Trailer

Rolling Stone

December 1, 2010 2:06 PM ET

Actor Michael Rapaport has been working on a documentary about legendary hip-hop group A Tribe Called Quest for years — and now a new trailer offers a tantalizing look at what's in store. The film, Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest , features extensive interviews with members Q-Tip, Phife Dawg, Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Jarobi, and details the quartet's pioneering career during the 1990s, the issues that initially split them up (and flared up again during a recent reunion tour) and Phife's ongoing diabetes-related health problems.

(The group's fractious relations are referenced in an apparently joking title shown at the end of the trailer: Beats, Rhymes & Fights.)

Photos: Random Notes

The doc features appearances from Kanye West, Nas, Mos Def, the Roots and many others who testify to the group's resounding influence, which includes humorous lyrics, previously unplumbed jazz samples, a mellow swagger and, as the Roots' ?uestlove puts it, the fact that the group "managed to rewrite the song structure for hip-hop."

The film is scheduled for release next year.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com